Golden Future Cup

The Golden Future Cup (sometimes referred as Gold Future Cup) is an annual one-shot manga competition that launched in Weekly Shonen Jump in 2004.

It is held in a series of 4-7 consecutive issues of Jump with a different entrant in each issue.  The one-shots are not only put up against each other, but the other series in the magazine as well.   During the Gold Future Cup, there is an option on the reader survey cards asking if readers would support the series or not.  The one-shots ranking in the magazine, as well as it's support count, determines the victor.  One-shots that do well in the Gold Future Cup have a good chance at serialisation. 
- Bakuman wiki  

The winner then has the ability to get serialised in Weekly Shonen Jump, the other winning works will not have this possibility unless it gets good results,  But despite good results in the competition, nothing assures that the works will survive long in the magazine, due to the presence of much more enduring and popular series.

The results contain one winner, and the other entries are awarded honourable mentions. On some occasions a series may receive first honourable mention, this means that it came in second place.

Note
WSJ - Weekly Shonen Jump
# - Number
Hoover over text for more information on it.

2016                                                                                                                     
Entry #1 - WSJ #40      - Legacy by Tomohide Hirao & Mizuki Yoda
Entry #2 - WSJ #41      - Boy the Gold by Kenta Yuzuriha
Entry #3 - WSJ #42      - Tokubetsu Kokkakōmuin Kaizōsha Taisakuka Tanaka Seiji by Keiji Amatsuka
Entry #4 - WSJ #43      - Taketori Tsuki Monogatari by Tomotaka Matsuda
Entry #5 - WSJ #44      - Nikai Bongai Barabarujura by Gege Akutami


2015                                                                                                                     
Entry #1 - WSJ #34      - Shōjo fukkyū recovery-Q by Subaru Mitsuhara
Entry #2 - WSJ #35      - Deadman Killer by Naoki Matsumoto
Entry #3 - WSJ #36      - Galaxy Gangs by Takamasa Moue
Entry #4 - WSJ #37/38 - Kurama no hirameki by Yutaka Oikawa
Entry #5 - WSJ #39      - Genjūi toteku by Hitsuji Gondaira
Entry #6 - WSJ #40      - Ryūjin-den Gagamaru by Yūki Uemura
Entry #7 - WSJ #41      - Carbonator by Atsuhito Muragimo

Results
Winner - Genjūi toteku
 

2014                                                                                                                     
Entry #1 - WSJ #35      - Nejiyama-san by Kouki Ishikawa
Entry #2 - WSJ #36      - Devily-man by Kentaro Fukuda
Entry #3 - WSJ #39      - Rokkotsu-san by Koyoharu Kotoge
Entry #4 - WSJ #40      - Brain Breaker by Yoshimichi Okamoto

Results
Winner - Devily-man


2013                                                                                                                      
There was no official Golden Future Cup in 2013, however some oneshots were published.
WSJ #41      - Takudo!! by Gaikokkaku Morita
WSJ #40      - Kaiki Combination by Mochizuki
WSJ #39      - Hinomaru Zumo by Kawada
WSJ #37/38 - Ana no Mujina by Youichi Amano


2012                                                                                                                     
Entry #1 - WSJ #35      - Goblin Night by Tomohiro Yagi
Entry #2 - WSJ #36/37 - Koi no Cupid Yakenohara Jin by Tomohiro Hasegawa
Entry #3 - WSJ #39      - After School☆Idol by Kazuro Kyou
Entry #4 - WSJ #40      - Inpwear Code by Keisuke Ikeda

Results
Winner - After School☆Idol
First Honourable Mention - Goblin Night


2011                                                                                                                     
Entry #1 - WSJ #32      - Takamagahara by Juuzou Kawai
Entry #2 - WSJ #33      - -Sins- by Masataka Miura
Entry #3 - WSJ #34      - Tsukimi no Soba by Yuuya Ogura
Entry #4 - WSJ #35/36 - Murahagane by Manabu Yasahiro
Entry #5 - WSJ #37      - Hungry Joker by Yuuki Tabata
Entry #6 - WSJ #38      - WolfXRed by Hideki Takahashi

Results
Winner - Hungry Joker
First Honourable Mention -  -Sins-



2010                                                                                                                      
Entry #1 - WSJ #34      - Kikai Tonchi Banashi Hanasaka Ikkyuu by Kenta Komiyama & Yuuya Kawada
Entry #2 - WSJ #35      - ShunkanXHeroism by Satoru Miura
Entry #3 - WSJ #36/37 - Black House by Hayato Yahagi & Kentaro Hidano
Entry #4 - WSJ #38      - Space Table Tennis by Tomoya Uno
Entry #5 - WSJ #39      - Sengoku Bashou by Yuuya Ogura

Results
Winner - Kikai Tonchi Banashi Hanasaka Ikkyuu


2009                                                                                                                      
Entry #1 - WSJ #35      - Meiji Hyakkiya Koten DENG! by Yusaku Shibata
Entry #2 - WSJ #36      - Crown! by Inayoshi Kei & Tsutomu Kobayashi
Entry #3 - WSJ #37/38 - North Island by Ei Ando
Entry #4 - WSJ #39      - Yonaoshi Densetsu!! Yona Oshiro by Hirofumi Neda
Entry #5 - WSJ #40      - Metallica Metalluca by Teruaki Mizuno

Results
Winner - Metallica Metalluca


2008                                                                                                                      
Entry #1 - WSJ #37/38 - Beelzebub by Ryuhei Tamura
Entry #2 - WSJ #39      - Arbeiter Kintarou by Hideki Takahashi
Entry #3 - WSJ #40      - Fight Prince Revolution by Yo Matsuyuki
Entry #4 - WSJ #41      - Kurogane by Masahiro Hirakata

Results
Winner - Beelzebub


2007                                                                                                                      
Entry #1 - WSJ #35      - Nurarihyon no Mago by Hiroshi Siibashi
Entry #2 - WSJ #36/37 - Muddy by Sho Aimoto
Entry #3 - WSJ #38      - Sugar Hero by Yutaka Oikawa
Entry #4 - WSJ #39      - Anaaski's by Kakunoshin Futsuzawa
Entry #5 - WSJ #40      - Anti Love Sentai - Hayata☆Joe by Kaito
Entry #6 - WSJ #41      - Clutch by Kosuke Hamada
Entry #7 - WSJ #42      - Dracula-kun to Tenchi-san by Kazuya Minamoto

Results
Winner - Nurarihyon no Mago
First Honourable Mention - Muddy


2006                                                                                                                     
There was no official Golden Future Cup in 2006, however the below oneshots were published and two were serialised
WSJ #39 - Sket Dance by Kentai Shinohara
WSJ #40 - Hitomi no Catoblepas by Yasuki
WSJ #41 - Team Made by Masahiro Hirakata


2005                                                                                                                     
Entry #1 - WSJ #36/37 - Usagi to Kame to Strike by Yoichi Amano
Entry #2 - WSJ #38      - Smashing Shonen! by Otake Toshiaki
Entry #3 - WSJ #39      - Baka in the city!! by Koji Oishi
Entry #4 - WSJ #40      - Mahotsukai Muku by Akira Okubo
Entry #5 - WSJ #41      - Nakkumoe by Katsutoshi Murase
Entry #6 - WSJ #42      - ①'Clock by Asuka Yamamoto

Results
Winner - Usagi to Kame to Strike


2004                                                                                                                    
Entry #1 - WSJ #34      - Pool Soul (Purusouru) by Teppei Fukushima
Entry #2 - WSJ #35      - Takaya - Otonari-san no Panic!! by Yujiro Sakamoto
Entry #3 - WSJ #36      - Bullet Time!! by Ryo Tasaka
Entry #4 - WSJ #37/38 - Muhyo & Roji's Bureau of Supernatural Investigation by Yoshiyuki Nishi
Entry #5 - WSJ #39      - Kirihoshi by Yuki Nakajima

Results
Winner - Takaya - Otonari-san no Panic!!
First Honourable Mention - Muhyo & Roji's Bureau of Supernatural Investigation by Yoshiyuki Nishi

4 comments:

  1. how do one enters the golden future cup?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Golden Future Cup is a competition where rookie mangakas enter their work through an assigned Jump editor who sponsors them for the competition.
      To get assigned to an editor one must either produce work regularly for them to review and critic, or through other competitions that they hold. A list of these can be found on the competition page.

      Delete
  2. When is the winner of the Golden Future Cup usually revealed?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It varies year on year. Sometimes the results are announced by the end of the year. At other times it is done later the following year.
      This depends on how well the oneshots have done in the competition and if any will be serialised.

      Delete